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Here many more!!!

Choose a topic, for example:  idioms with animals, with parts of the body, etc and prepare a poster similar to the ones in the examples above.

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Mock Papers

Ver las imágenes de origen

Poetry and Prose

Drama

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Art and Literature

Let’s watch some videos

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-art-can-help-you-analyze-amy-e-herman

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/how-art-gives-shape-to-cultural-change-thelma-golden

https://ed.ted.com/lessons/jane-hirshfield-the-art-of-the-metaphor

Now, choose a painting that you like and work on:

  • the artista and the art movement
  • where the painting is (museum, important building, etc)
  • what the painting transmits
  • imagine the story behind the painting (include a metaphor)

Here some museums to visit online

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Essay writing

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Read this poem, and then answer the question that follows it:

Song: Tears, Idle Tears

Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,
Tears from the depth of some divine despair
Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes,
In looking on the happy Autumn-fields,
And thinking of the days that are no more.

Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail,
That brings our friends up from the underworld,
Sad as the last which reddens over one
That sinks with all we love below the verge;
So sad, so fresh, the days that are no more.

Ah, sad and strange as in dark summer dawns
The earliest pipe of half-awakened birds
To dying ears, when unto dying eyes
The casement slowly grows a glimmering square;
So sad, so strange, the days that are no more.

Dear as remembered kisses after death,
And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned
On lips that are for others; deep as love,
Deep as first love, and wild with all regret;
O Death in Life, the days that are no more.
(Alfred, Lord Tennyson)

Explore the ways in which Tennyson creates deep feelings of sadness in this poem.

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If (by Rudyard Kipling)

If—

If this poem was written today, what would you think of the author?

Would he be famous and admired? Why/Why not?

 

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Poem: Tears, Idle Tears

Tears, Idle Tears

Tears, idle tears, I know not what they mean,
Tears from the depth of some divine despair
Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes,
In looking on the happy autumn-fields,
And thinking of the days that are no more.

    Fresh as the first beam glittering on a sail,
That brings our friends up from the underworld,
Sad as the last which reddens over one
That sinks with all we love below the verge;
So sad, so fresh, the days that are no more.

    Ah, sad and strange as in dark summer dawns
The earliest pipe of half-awakened birds
To dying ears, when unto dying eyes
The casement slowly grows a glimmering square;
So sad, so strange, the days that are no more.

    Dear as remembered kisses after death,
And sweet as those by hopeless fancy feigned
On lips that are for others; deep as love,
Deep as first love, and wild with all regret;
O Death in Life, the days that are no more!

Summary

The speaker sings of the baseless and inexplicable tears that rise in his heart and pour forth from his eyes when he looks out on the fields in autumn and thinks of the past.

This past, (“the days that are no more”) is described as fresh and strange. It is as fresh as the first beam of sunlight that sparkles on the sail of a boat bringing the dead back from the underworld, and it is sad as the last red beam of sunlight that shines on a boat that carries the dead down to this underworld.

The speaker then refers to the past as not “fresh,” but “sad” and strange. As such, it resembles the song of the birds on early summer mornings as it sounds to a dead person, who lies watching the “glimmering square” of sunlight as it appears through a square window.

Finally, the speaker declares the past to be dear, sweet, deep, and wild. It is as dear as the memory of the kisses of one who is now dead, and it is as sweet as those kisses that we imagine ourselves bestowing on lovers who actually have loyalties to others. So, too, is the past as deep as “first love” and as wild as the regret that usually follows this experience. The speaker concludes that the past is a “Death in Life.”

Quote from the poem to prove this summary is ok.

Activities

1. Do research on the writer: Alfred Lord Tennyson

2. Read the poem and comment on the title.

3. Wach the following videos: anootate the poem

 

4. Write two questions that you have about the poem

Posted in 2019, Senior 3 2019 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Every movie teaches a lesson

Resultado de imagen para la la land movieResultado de imagen para la la land movie

Lessons the movie teaches the audience: 

Here 3 lessons you can learn while and after watching the movie. For each lesson, explain when in the movie the lesson takes place, who teaches it and what you think about it.

Then, provide a lesson #4 and say why you believe the movie wants us to learn that new lesson for our life.

LESSON #1: THE WAVERING PERSEVERANCE OF THE STRUGGLING ARTIST

LESSON #2: THE COMPETITION BETWEEN PERSONAL LOVES AND ROMANTIC LOVES

LESSON #3: FANTASIES RARELY BECOME REALITY

LESSON #4:

Choose an option to write an essay

  1. Following your dream is something that everyone wants to do, but sometimes dreams might seem unrealistic and frankly nearly impossible.
  2. Read what Mia says in a song: Here’s to the ones who dream, foolish as they may seem. Here’s to the hearts that ache. Here’s to the mess we make”. Does having dreams hurt?
  3. We all risk failure when we take on anything that’s worth doing. How does the movie tackle failure and frustration?
  4.  La La Land , is an ode to Los Angeles artists and dreamers, the harsh realities of pursuing a creative career hits the main characters like a ton of bricks. Do you agree?
Posted in 2019, Senior 5 Lang & Lit 2019 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Writing a Literary Essay

What Is a Literary Essay?

A literary analysis essay is an academic assignment that examines and evaluates a work of literature or a given aspect of a specific literary piece. It tells about the big idea or theme of a text you’ve read.

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You are not supposed to write about what the text is about, but to offer a personal response, a piece of literary criticism, a response to an essay question.

In the most basic form, these are the steps you should follow:

  • Understand the purpose of a literary analysis.
  • Plan
  • Write (make sure you answer the essay question)
  • Edit

What Is the Purpose of a Literary Analysis Essay?

The main purpose of a literary analysis essay is to prove that you’ve carefully examined and evaluated a work of literature from various aspects. First of all, you must understand the term analysis. It means breaking something up to its essential components, and analyzing how their features contribute towards the overall impression.

Literary devices are things the author uses to tell the story or make a point. They could include alliteration, imagery, metaphors, allusions, allegories, repetition, flashback, foreshadowing, or any number of other devices the author employs to write the story or poem

When you’re reading for pleasure, you’re mainly focused on emotions and visualizations of the scenes and characters. You’ll still pay attention to those elements of the reading process, but you’ll also be analytical towards the book. You’ll consider these elements:

  • Subject
  • Form and Style
  • Main theme and tones
  • Characters’ strengths and flaws
  • Storyline strengths and flaws
  • Point of view
  • etc.

Structure to write an essay

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Inserting quotations

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Linkers and connectors are words that relate one idea or sentence of the text with another. They connect the ideas logically.
Why are they used?
They give direction to the writer. They are also used to guide the reader through his thoughts. They make the meaning specific.

Using connectors

Verbs we need to understand

Introducing quotations

Unseen Paper

 

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1. Planning

2. Relevant to the question asked

3. Use the author’s name

4. Synonyms for the word ‘suggest’

5. Introduction – don’t spend too long (3 sentences)

6. Isolate a good quote Make a point / embed Identify technique / broad analysis Zoom in / word level analysis Context Sound level analysis (sibilance) Reference to the form of text

7. Infer deeply

8. Structure

9. Sophisticated way of writing

10. Practice writing essays

11. Response – feminist, masculine, modern, contemporary

12. Point of view/voice

13. Summary – a new, short conclusion

Posted in 2019, Senior 3 2019 | Tagged | Leave a comment

Ode on Melancholy (Part 1)

TASK 1: What is melancholy? Can you find a definition?

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TASK 2: Find a definition for ODE.

The author: John Keats

John Keats

TASK 3: Read his biography and take notes involving important event in his life that influenced his writings.

https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Keats/The-year-1819

Task 4: Read the poem.

What do you think this poem is about?

Ode on Melancholy by JOHN KEATS

No, no, go not to Lethe, neither twist

       Wolf’s-bane, tight-rooted, for its poisonous wine;

Nor suffer thy pale forehead to be kiss’d

       By nightshade, ruby grape of Proserpine;

               Make not your rosary of yew-berries,

       Nor let the beetle, nor the death-moth be

               Your mournful Psyche, nor the downy owl

A partner in your sorrow’s mysteries;

       For shade to shade will come too drowsily,

               And drown the wakeful anguish of the soul.

But when the melancholy fit shall fall

       Sudden from heaven like a weeping cloud,

That fosters the droop-headed flowers all,

       And hides the green hill in an April shroud;

Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose,

       Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave,

               Or on the wealth of globed peonies;

Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows,

       Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave,

               And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes.

She dwells with Beauty—Beauty that must die;

       And Joy, whose hand is ever at his lips

Bidding adieu; and aching Pleasure nigh,

       Turning to poison while the bee-mouth sips:

Ay, in the very temple of Delight

       Veil’d Melancholy has her sovran shrine,

               Though seen of none save him whose strenuous tongue

       Can burst Joy’s grape against his palate fine;

His soul shalt taste the sadness of her might,

               And be among her cloudy trophies hung.

Task 5: Check out this link to understand the poem deeply

Task 6: Now watch this video and amalyse the poem in full using the following guide:

The worksheet is just a guide to help you analyse the poem. you don´t have to fully complete the worksheet, just focus on what is relevant for your poem.

9th Grade Poetry Analysis Worksheet

Posted in 2019, DHsecundaria, Senior 1 2019 | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Encuentro #10

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Y llegamos a nuestro último encuentro!!

Algunos de ustedes ya casi tienen su charla lista….y otros aún están escribiendo.

Hoy nos reunimos para trabajar profundamente en cada charla y para despedir este hermoso ciclo juntos!

De ahora en más, nos reuniremos para practicar la charla y hacer cambios pertinentes!!

Gracias por este año!

Posted in 2019, Club de Ideas, DHsecundaria | Tagged , | Leave a comment

There Will Come Soft rains (review)

More ideas that will help you

Relationship between the family (man) and nature

The automated house of Bradbury’s story presents itself as the perfect environment for human beings—a space that readily caters to nearly every imaginable need. To do so, however, it relies a great deal on the natural world, both for inspiration (many of its automated functions, such as the robot mice, are based on animals) and for the raw materials to keep running. By having the house ultimately succumb to a fire and be destroyed by the natural world, Bradbury suggests that nature is more powerful than whatever man can create.

Bradbury physically establishes the animosity between the house—a symbol of technology—and the natural world. The house protects its residents from the forces of nature: its walls close out harsh weather, its kitchen machines spare humans from hunting and foraging in the wilderness, and the cleaning mice ward off the chaos of the outdoors, cleaning up the mud, dust, and hair that accumulate in a natural environment. This house even seems to take its responsibility to battle nature a bit too far. It shuts itself whenever “lonely foxes and whining cats” get too close. Comically, the narrator describes the stern response of the house to a sparrow brushing up against the window: “No, not even a bird must touch the house!” This protective impulse turns sinister when the house dispassionately disposes of the family dog’s carcass, treating the pet as nothing more than some smelly bio-matter.

When nature threatens to destroy it, technology is able to put up a comprehensive defense. For instance, when a fallen tree causes a house fire, machines come out in full force to battle the hostile foe. Mechanical doors shut against fire in an act of self-defense. “Blind robot faces” spray green fire repellent. And when fire-fighting fails, voices cry out in warning, as a lookout might upon spotting enemy troops. Yet even as technology tries to subdue nature, it can’t help but rely on it. This technology is created in nature’s image and fueled by natural resources. Machines in the house are often likened to animals, suggesting that nature has already created perfect “machines” that humanity simply is attempting to copy for its own ends. Furthermore, technology cannot exist without the raw materials that nature provides: the house has been built out of oak, wired with metal tubes, and it’s powered by the natural force of electricity. The house ultimately fails because its water reserves are depleted, meaning that it can’t put out the fire that consumes it.

Despite presenting an alternative to the natural order, technology ultimately looks weak compared with nature. After a day of fussing over the artificial environment that the house has created, the home settles in for the night. While the house is sleeping, nature launches its attack by letting a tree fall on the home, causing the fire. Though the house attempts to defend itself, the fire is described as “clever” and ultimately overpowers the upstart domicile. Bradbury seems to suggest that the victory is justified—that the arrogance of technology is finally being subdued. The eventual ease with which technology is outdone by nature suggests that it was arrogant and foolish to attempt to challenge the natural order in the first place.

In the end, nature can persist without technology, but the reverse is not true. The poem by Sara Teasdale paints a picture of nature persisting even when everything men ever created has died away. Since nature is vast and self-sustaining, it cannot brake or run out of fuel the way machines do. And even in the face of the overwhelming and devastating effects of technology—the atom bomb, which has reduced the natural world to a radioactive wasteland of “rubble” and “ashes”—Bradbury suggests that nature will prevail. There are still trees, birds, foxes, cats, and dogs at the end of the story, implying that nature may, in time, thrive once again. Meanwhile, people and their technology have been wiped from the face of the Earth, showing that nature is the ultimate winner of this struggle.

Analysis of the poem

What happened to the people?

“At 10:15, the sprinklers turn on. The water runs down the west side of the house, whose white paint is completely charred except in “five places”: the silhouettes of a man mowing, a woman gardening, and a boy and girl tossing a ball “which never came down.”

This passage confirms the reader’s suspicion that the residents may be dead. Bradbury includes the silhouettes of the McClellan Family (readers learn the surname later) to demonstrate how fleeting life can be. Based on the everyday actions, each person seems not to have expected that his or her life was about to end. Death comes faster than gravity, as readers see with the “ball which never came down.”

Ideas for question 5

At 2:35, the house spreads out bridge tables on the patio. Playing cards, martinis, and egg-salad sandwiches materialize as music plays. Nothing is used, and at four the tables fold away “like great butterflies back through the paneled walls.”

The playing cards, martinis, and egg-salad sandwiches that the house sets out for the McClellans characterize the family as ordinary, since these were all popular items for Bradbury’s contemporaries. He fills the house with games, food, and drinks that feel normal to indicate that this family is like any other. In so doing, Bradbury implies that any conclusions the reader draws about this family apply to society at large. On another note, the bridge tables resemble butterflies. They are another example of technology imitating nature.

At 4:30, the walls of the nursery transform into a moving picture of a safari, complete with “yellow giraffes, blue lions, pink antelopes, lilac panthers…the patter of okapi feet and the murmur of a fresh jungle rain.” After a while, the animals retreat to watering holes and thickets. This is “the children’s hour.”

The safari theme in the nursery is the most visually overwhelming example of technology that depends on nature. Even though technology is trying to create a more entertaining replacement for the world outside, it cannot help but show content made in nature’s image.

The End

At dawn, as the sun rises over “heaped rubble and steam,” the clock cries out over the wreckage. It says, “Today is August 5, 2026, today is August 5, 2026, today is…”

The sunrise serves as a grim reminder that there is a new beginning daily—whether or not the legacy of mankind reaches that new day. The house has been reduced to a pile of rubbish, which makes the reader skeptical that technology or the impact of humans will be a part of the future. Even though time, death, and nature all seem to have succeeded where mankind and technology failed, one voice still grasps for control in vain. The clock that spoke at the beginning of the story tries to claim one last day with its dying breath.

 

Posted in 2019, Senior 1 2019 | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

The Lady in the Looking Glass: A Reflection

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Virginia Woolf

Answer the following questions in your blog. 

  1. Notice how the mirror in the first paragpraph is set up as the frame for a kind of a portrait.
  2. The unnamed narrator attempts to construct a portrait of the Isabella Tyson that consisits of her outer self and her inner self. The portrait is reflected in the objects inside and outside the house as they reflect in the mirror. Describe the images reflected in the mirror.
  3. What kind of contrast is there between the objects inside the house and outside the house, as they are reflected in the mirror?
  4. Describe how the narrator attempts to compose the portrait through the mood inside the room, through her own imagination, and through the presentation of Isabella in the mirror
  5. What are the known facts about Isabella’s outer self?
  6. What material objects inside and outside the house does the narrator use to imagine Isabella’s life?
  7. What are Isabella’s letters supposed to conceal, according to the narrator? What would one know if one could only read them?
  8. At the end of the story, according to the narrator, is it possible to know objectovely one’s inner reality?
  9. In this story Woolf questions whether the inner self of an individaul is finally knowable. What do you think is her conclusion? Provide support for your statement.
  10. What do you think is the role of the mirror in the story? How has the mirror been used as a metaphor in literature?
  11. Describe the charactersitics of this story that resemble stream-of-consciousness narrative technique.

Find a picture of a room inside and a garden to illustrate the house in the story

Read the following text. How is this related to the story?

Post your answer in your blog. Due Date: May 22

Posted in 2018, Senior 4 2018 | Tagged , | Leave a comment